High School Literature?

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High School Literature?

Postby MichelleL on Thu Mar 20, 2014 2:08 pm

Peyton (my son) starts High School in the fall. I am looking into things to use for him.
Considering Beautiful feet for Literature, History. The website says for Ancients he would receive 1 credit in Literature, 1 in Ancient History, 1/2 in geography. (Not sure why a credit for Bible isn't given.)

Has anyone done this with a high schooler, and how could I incorporate Lexi (7th grade) into this? Does the Sr. High pack come with lower grade ideas, and assignments? Or do I need the intermediate Ancient pack?

Does anyone else have anything else they would recommend?

Also could I just have him choose some literature on his own and let him work through a book like this?
http://www.rainbowresource.com/product/ ... 689160c3df It looks very generic and like it could be used for many different types of literature. Does the analysis need to be essay based all the time?

Also is there a certain number of books each year they should read through for a literature credit? The last time we did BF I read aloud the books, but now he will be reading on his own. (A big issue is if he doesn't like the book. I had the same issue in school, I hated reading stuff I didn't want to read.)
Can he choose literature he wants to read within reason?


Also what about English? I don't want to get bogged down in something like IEW.
Nourish a child daily with loving, right, and noble ideas...
which may bear fruit in his life.”
--Charlotte Mason, 1842-1923
Happily Homeschooling Peyton age 12 and Lexi age 10.

http://www.lightsonthelake.blogspot.com
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Re: High School Literature?

Postby Suz MamaFrog on Sat Mar 22, 2014 10:45 am

Michelle,

Long time no see!....Well, for me, anyway.....As to BF, we had a very bad experience with it last year. The "guide" turned out to be a list of titles and comprehension questions for SOME of the titles but not all. We tried the US and World History one, BTW, and felt like I'd wasted my money.

Answers to your questions: There are no set number of books that have to be read for high school credit, although most colleges expect one year of American lit, one of British lit, and one of mixed or "genre exposure" - usually done through short stories. And most "programs" that you see require three to four full novels minimum, with poetry and a few shorter pieces thrown in. Yes, analysis is typically done through essays, in preparation for the analytical essays required in college. As to grammar, you should really only need one year or so of a review. The rest of his "language arts" should come in the form of writing - essays, reports, narrations of his readings, creative writing, etc. - and these assignments could come from ALL his subjects, not just "English". You'd have to check for proper grammar, spelling, etc. and correct any mistakes you found, but really, it would be enough. Do some sort of vocabulary building work, or simply have him keep a list of words when he finds them in his reading - create his own personal glossary, if you will, of words he doesn't know, and/or misspells when writing.

As to alternatives to BF - I like the looks, but not the price, of Lightning Literature by Hewitt Homeschool. And since I didn't like the price, I went searching elsewhere. I found an OK resource in GA Virtual Online courses. I say OK because I don't really like online learning, or public school based stuff, but it worked as a resource for ideas. I copied and pasted to create a "real" book we could use offline, and supplemented where the videos are (half of the ones we tried wouldn't work for us.) I'll share the link, just in case you want to give it a try: GA Virtual Online 9th Grade Literature and Composition. You can see other courses in the little nav box on the left of the page. Another option for you might be Learning language Arts Through Literature's two high school courses. You could also check out some of the Charlotte Mason sites - Ambleside Online, Simply Charlotte Mason, Charlotte Mason Help - and peruse their high school literature choices and come up with your own reading list for each year.

One option to the reading/literature dilemma would be to use the "point system". Create a book list of various titles - you'll want a nice selection for him to choose from. Then assign each book a point value - 1/2 point for less than 100 pages, 1 point for 100 - 200 pages, 1 1/2 points for 200 - 300 pages, 2 points for over 300 - and then come up with a total number of points he has to read for the year. (For my kids, I asked for 10 points.) We did this all through middle school, and for the life of me I can't think of why we aren't using it for high school.....May have to change that next year! LOL

HTH!
Suz
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Re: High School Literature?

Postby MichelleL on Sun Mar 23, 2014 9:50 pm

Yes, it has been awhile! Nice to be back? I used Queens English in the past. Would that be sufficient and then add in a literature? I am also thinking about the transitional program level -the one with the grammar review and then the final 3 for the other 3 years.

I am also considering SOS. Just because it is solid, but I have had a love/hate relationship with it in the past. So tedious and boring. Not sure if I could count a literature credit with just the LA in SOS or if I would need a separate Literature program.

I would prefer Queens and then adding in literature and think it might be a good fit. I am looking at 180 Day Around the World for geography/history and I think the recommended reading in that could count for literature-so what could I use as a supplement to teach him to analyze literature?
For vocabulary we have ROCK the SAT Vocabulary.

Also do you normally list the books you have read on a transcript? How would a college know what you have read?
Nourish a child daily with loving, right, and noble ideas...
which may bear fruit in his life.”
--Charlotte Mason, 1842-1923
Happily Homeschooling Peyton age 12 and Lexi age 10.

http://www.lightsonthelake.blogspot.com
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MichelleL
 
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Re: High School Literature?

Postby Suz MamaFrog on Mon Mar 24, 2014 1:15 am

Unless he likes days and days of copywork - I mean weeks' worth of it without a break - stay away from Queen's. My daughter refers to her one year of Queen's high school level (we'd used it for most of middle school, too) as the "year of writer's cramp." Over half the lessons are daily copywork, with just a few lessons in between before more copywork comes along. She was bored to tears with it.

There's one program that I forgot to mention, because it's so new....the Excellence in Writing folks have come up with Excellence in Literature. The first course teaches literary analysis. I've not used it, because she's in 10th grade now, and I just "discovered" it, but you're starting in 9th, so you might want to give it a try.....

No, we do not list the individual books read in each course. High schools and colleges don't, so there's no need. We DO keep our reading lists from each year, but that's more for our own records than anything else.

I'm not familiar with the history/geography program you mentioned, so I have no idea what literature is used, or if it would considered high school material. Sorry....

HTH!
Suz
Not all those who wander are lost. - JRR Tolkien

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Re: High School Literature?

Postby MichelleL on Mon Mar 24, 2014 2:30 pm

I want to use more of a unit study type approach, since he will already have literature he needs to read for the geography/history program (it is by Apologia). http://shop.apologia.com/around-the-wor ... kbook.html I would like to just use those for analysis. (How could I do this?) Isn't there some generic type forms he could use that would teach him to analyze literature in general? Also as he covers countries and cultures he could read/write about different religions of the area in his research.

So how does one deem if it is enough for a credit?
Nourish a child daily with loving, right, and noble ideas...
which may bear fruit in his life.”
--Charlotte Mason, 1842-1923
Happily Homeschooling Peyton age 12 and Lexi age 10.

http://www.lightsonthelake.blogspot.com
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MichelleL
 
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Location: Tennessee

Re: High School Literature?

Postby Wende on Mon Mar 24, 2014 10:50 pm

Have you looked at Glencoe? http://www.glencoe.com/sec/literature/litlibrary/

Lots of titles to choose from, good literary analysis. They are free. They each have historical/geographical background, so could be spine for unit studies.
Living and learning along with dh of 26 years, dd17 (senior!) and dd19 (2015 grad!)
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Re: High School Literature?

Postby Suz MamaFrog on Tue Mar 25, 2014 2:05 pm

For figuring credits, you could use the system many schools use - by the amount of time it takes to complete the study. This is called a Carnegie unit. 150 hours of study equal one Carnegie unit or one credit. That equals out to 5 hours a week for 30 weeks. If you do a longer or shorter school year, you'd have to adjust accordingly.

And I second the Glencoe stuff, but it would mean more reading. It's not very Charlotte Mason-ish, but if that's not a problem, they are nice. We've used some of the middle school titles in the past.

Another product that has it all laid out for you, is high school level, and uses short stories instead of full length novels (something he'll need to be reading at some point anyway) is Windows to the World. We tried it in dd's 8th grade. She hated it because she's opposed to anything "workbookish" but it might just fit right up your alley. All the stories are in the text, so there's no extra literature to track down. There's a schedule for assignments in the TG, as well as info on how to grade the essays, etc. It's a good product, just not for Miss K. We're using Excellence in Literature. It's fairly new, and uses full length works to teach both literature and analytical composition writing.

HTH!
Not all those who wander are lost. - JRR Tolkien

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Re: High School Literature?

Postby MichelleL on Wed Apr 09, 2014 7:28 pm

Thanks both the Glencoe and Windows to the World look like they will be great resources! :thumb:
Nourish a child daily with loving, right, and noble ideas...
which may bear fruit in his life.”
--Charlotte Mason, 1842-1923
Happily Homeschooling Peyton age 12 and Lexi age 10.

http://www.lightsonthelake.blogspot.com
User avatar
MichelleL
 
Posts: 1316
Joined: Tue Sep 16, 2008 3:27 pm
Location: Tennessee


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